Storage Tips: Greens

Bag them Greens, ya’ll!
Fresh, early season greens totally rule… that is, until they start looking like that gross lady in the bathtub from The Shining. Here’s how you avoid that.

What You’ll Need:
  • Some plastic ziplock bags, a sealable tupperware, or some of those green bags they sell on TV…if that’s how you roll.
  • Some paper or cloth towels.
  • Greens, duh

Directions
The major principle here is trying to maintain and regulate moisture and keep anything that may already be rotting from affecting the rest of the bunch. Greens, obviously, have a lot of water in them. You want them to be able to retain that, without having much water on the surface of their leaves. Excessive moisture causes them to stick to the sides of the storage container or one another, thereby rotting more quickly.  You also want to seal them in an airtight bag so they don’t get zapped of moisture once nestled in your fridge.
 
For the Overachiever: 
Technically speaking, the best practice is to sort, trim, wash and very diligently dry your greens before wrapping them and storing them. They’ll last the longest, and it will also reduce the amount of prep work you have come dinnertime. But don’t take my word for it: Uber Detailed, Type-A instructions for doing all of that are included here
 
For the C- Student:
Dude, just rip off anything semi-gross, wrap that sucker in a paper towel and throw it in a plastic ziplock bag. You’ll be doing yourself a huge favor. Like this:
 
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Prospect Park CSA in the News!

The Prospect Heights Patch covered our launch, check out the article!

Members can pick up their shares from Fountain Studios (604 Grand Street between Bergen Street and Saint Marks Avenue), a group of artist studios that regularly  hosts gallery shows and other community events.

“We want to highlight the CSA, but also this local neighborhood spot,” Santogade told me.

Santogade said that a fundamental reason for having a CSA is “the idea of creating community.” She worries that although the concept of a CSA is becoming increasingly popular, people often forget the community building aspect of the project.

“This is not just about picking up food,” she said. “It offers a way to get to know your neighborhood and neighbors.”

Indeed! If you haven’t already, join us!